Is BAHS Right For You?

  

For purposes of this discussion, we’re assuming you’re familiar with bone conduction hearing and you’ve determined a bone- anchored hearing device is right for your hearing loss.

The first thing to do is see an audiologist for a hearing test and the chance to try out all the bone conduction hearing devices on the market – ours, and our competitors’ – because nothing you read on this (or any) site will come close to trying bone-anchored hearing devices out for yourself.

Of course, the most single important feature of any hearing device is how well you hear when using it. Beyond that, consider these deciding factors:


Abutment or Abutment-Free?

The question of abutments (also known as “posts” or “screws”) relates to how you want to fasten the sound processor to your head.

You have three choices: Abutments, Magnets, and Headbands.


Abutments:

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Dating back to the 1970s, an abutment is the “original” way a sound processor would be held in place. This “per-cutaneous” (through the skin) procedure is fine most of the time but sometimes leads to complications. 


Headbands:

A headband of hard plastic or soft fabric can be used to hold the sound processor in place.

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Headbands are primarily used in pediatric cases, especially because no bone conduction hearing implant is indicated for children under the age of 5. Headbands are also a risk-free way for you to wear and test a SophonoTM bone conduction hearing device for a week, before choosing surgery.

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Abutment-Free

Abutment-Free (Magnets):

A magnet implanted behind the ear uses magnetism to keep the sound processor in place.

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Recognizing patients’ preferences for an abutment-free solution, Dr. Ralf Siegert invented the first commercially successful “trans-cutaneous” (through unbroken skin) system that is the basis for today’s SophonoTM solution.

Comfort

The Sophono™ magnetic bone-anchored hearing system (BAHS) features Patient-Controlled Comfort™. With Sophono™, you’ll be able to switch the Attract® magnet spacer strength to your comfort and physical activity level. The Attract® magnet spacers come in multiple strengths to allow for optimal comfort and are professionally fit and adjusted by your audiologist.

Cosmetics

The Sophono™ processor is small, has a low profile and can be hidden under the hair. Processors come in four elegant colors and can be accessorized with Skinit decals. With abutment-free hearing — there’s no visible, skin-penetrating abutment to clean each day.

Implant Size — Designed With Your Safety In Mind

Sophono™ boasts the lowest profile implant on the market, a safe alternative to more intrusive implants.1 Our low profile implant follows the curve of the bone, making it a safe bone conduction implant.2

Other magnetic BAHS sit above the surface of the skull and can cause a visible bump. The SophonoTM implant has a low profile and can be implanted completely flat against the skull, hidden under your hair.3,4,5

The implant lies completely under skin and has low risk of skin issues.6,7 As a result, the low-profile implant is less likely to have severe complications after trauma – far safer for a more active lifestyle.8,9

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Would You Like to Try the Medtronic Bone-Anchored Hearing System?

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Our newest device, Sophono™ the Alpha 2 MPO™, is the result of more than 10 years of research and clinical testing. The abutment-free bone anchored hearing system (BAHS) provides you an innovative hearing therapy.

To learn about the Sophono ™ Alpha 2 MPO™ please refer to the Sophono™  Pediatric Guide or Consumer Guide (PDF).

Please also explore the Frequently Asked Questions about the Sophono Alpha 2 MPO™.

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MRI Safety — No Need for Implant Removal

Sophono™ patients with magnetic implants can have MRI tests done safely — the Sophono™  implant has FDA conditional clearance for up to a 3 tesla MRI scan. The Sophono™ implant has the smallest transcutaneous MRI shadow at 5 centimeters.10,11  Your audiologist can explain this in more detail for you.

 

Fast and Simple Surgery

A simple outpatient surgery means you’ll be able to be fitted for your Alpha 2 MPO™ processor only four weeks after the operation. Check with your physician to determine the proper timing for fitting your magnetic processor.12,13,14,15


Battery Life

You’ll get up to two weeks’ of battery life. That’s more convenient and less expensive for you to maintain.16

Proprietary TET™ (Transcutaneous Energy Transfer)

You’ll enjoy maximum sound transfer from the Alpha 2 MPO™ device, through your skin and magnetic implant to the working cochlea, thanks to our trademarked TET™ (Transcutaneous Energy Transfer) technology.17


Hear More To Do More

Sophono™ offers more sound amplification (gain) than any other magnetic transcutaneous system!18


Designed for You

The processor is a completely programmable, digital hearing system including 8 channels, 16 frequency bands, and 4 programs. Dual-directional microphone system amplifies the sound in front of you while reducing background noise; Automatic feedback suppression; Direct audio input for FM, personal music players, and mobile phones.

The Sophono™
Alpha 2 and Alpha 1 Devices

While the first generation devices, the Alpha 1 and 2, are no longer sold, we continue to support patients with information and customer care. The most current processor available is the Alpha 2 MPO™ magnetic bone- anchored hearing system (BAHS). Please check with your doctor and audiologist to see if the Sophono™  is right for you.

 

 

 

Important Notice for Prospective Hearing Aid Users

Good health practice requires that a person with a hearing loss have a medical evaluation by a licensed physician (preferably a physician who specializes in diseases of the ear) before purchasing a hearing aid. Licensed physicians who specialize in diseases of the ear are often referred to as otolaryngologists, otologists or otorhinolaryngologists. The purpose of medical evaluation is to assure that all medically treatable conditions that may affect hearing are identified and treated before the hearing aid is purchased.

The audiologist or hearing aid dispenser will conduct a hearing aid evaluation to assess your ability to hear with and without a hearing aid. The hearing aid evaluation will enable the audiologist or dispenser to select and fit a hearing aid to your individual needs.

If you have reservations about your ability to adapt to amplification, you should inquire about the availability of a trial-rental or purchase-option program. Many hearing aid dispensers now offer programs that permit you to wear a hearing aid for a period of time for a nominal fee after which you may decide if you want to purchase the hearing aid.

If you have reservations about your ability to adapt to amplification, you should inquire about the availability of a trial-rental or purchase-option program. Many hearing aid dispensers now offer programs that permit you to wear a hearing aid for a period of time for a nominal fee after which you may decide if you want to purchase the hearing aid.

Children with Hearing Loss

In addition to seeing a physician for a medical evaluation, a child with a hearing loss should be directed to an audiologist for evaluation and rehabilitation since hearing loss may cause problems in language development and the educational and social growth of a child. An audiologist is qualified by training and experience to assist in the evaluation and rehabilitation of a child with a hearing loss.


 

 References

  1. Based on physical characteristics of the implant.
  2. Siegert R and Kanderske J. A New Semi-Implantable Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Device: Clinical, Surgical, and Audiologic Outcomes in Patients with Congenital Ear Canal Atresia. Otology & Neurotology 2013, 34:927-934.
  3. Magliulo G, Turchetta R, Iannella G, di Masino RV, de Vincentiis M. Sophono™  Alpha System and subtotal petrosectomy with external auditory canal blind sac closure. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2015 Sep;272(9):2183-90.
  4. Siegert R. Magnetic Coupling of partially implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids Without Open Implants, Laryngorhinootologie. 2010 Jun;89(6):346-51.
  5. Siegert R. Semi-implantable transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device with fitting on the day of surgery. Presented at the 29th Politzer Society Meeting Antalya, Turkey, Nov 2013.
  6. Siegert R. Semi-implantable transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device with fitting on the day of surgery. Presented at the 29th Politzer Society Meeting Antalya, Turkey, Nov 2013.
  7. Centric A and Chennupati, SK, Abutment-free bone-anchored hearing devices in children: Initial results and experience – International Journal of Pediatric Otolaryngology 2014.
  8. Siegert, R. Magnetic Coupling of partially implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids Without Open Implants, Laryngorhinootologie. 2010 Jun;89(6):346-51. “They could also pursue any contact sport without putting themselves and others under any increased risk of injury.”
  9. Siegert, R. Partially Implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids without a Percutaneous Abutment (Otomag); Technique and Preliminary Clinical Results, Adv Otorhinolaryngol. 2011;71;41-6. “There is no increased risk for injury, whether for themselves or their sports partner.”
  10. Internal Test Report, Evaluations of Magnetic Field Interactions, Hearing and Artifacts for the Alpha 1 (M) Magnetic Implant, Frank G. Shellock, Ph.D, FACR, FISMRM, August 10, 2012.
  11. Azadarmaki R, Tubbs R, Chen DA, Shellock FG. MRI information of commonly used otologic implants: Review and update. Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery 2014, Vol. 150(4) 512.
  12. Denoyelle F, Coudert C, Thierry B, Parodi M, Mazzaschi O, Vicaut E, Tessier N, Loundon N, Garabedian EN. Hearing rehabilitation with the closed skin bone-anchored implant Sophono™  Alpha1: Results of a prospective study in 15 children with ear atresia. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015 Mar;79(3):382-7.
  13. Friedland DR; Runge CL; Kerschner JA. Surgical implantation of the Sophono tr™ anscutaneous bone conduction system. Op Tech in Otolaryngology 2014, 25: 344-347.
  14. Comparison of Two Different Sound Processors with a Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Hearing System in Single Sided Deafness Patients presented by Andrew de Jong M.D. at 29th Politzer Society Meeting, Antalya, Turkey, November 16, 2013.
  15. Siegert R and Kanderske J. A New Semi-Implantable Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Device: Clinical, Surgical, and Audiologic Outcomes in Patients with Congenital Ear Canal Atresia.
  16. Sophono™  Internal Validation Testing of Battery Life.
  17. Sophono™  Scientific White Paper: Transcutaneous Energy Transfer by Bone Conductors through the Skin 29 September 2013.18Comparing published transcutaneous device specifications of acousto-mechanical gain at 1.6 KHz and 60 dB SPL.

 

 

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